In harmony with the seasons: Choyo no Sekku

choyu-no-sekku


The “yang” of the “yin-yang” concept is thought to become too strong and hence inauspicious on dates which are odd-numbered in both day and month. The sekku, or seasonal festival, became an event to counter this threat. Within these days, September 9th is known as the Choyo no Sekku as it is the day when the number strongest in “yang” is doubled. It has long been believed that when the power of the nature becomes too overbearing, the life of mankind is endangered. In order to avert that danger and pray for a long life, chrysanthemum flowers are soaked in water or sake and drunk for its blood-cleansing properties. In a time when most illnesses were thought to be caused by impurities in the blood, the chrysanthemum was a type of precious kampo medicine that only the royalty could afford. One of the rituals carried out during the Choyo no Sekku is to place a wad of silk on top of chrysanthemum flowers and to use the parts that absorbed the flower’s dew to wipe one’s body to cleanse oneself. The folksong, “Kikudoji”, used frequently in noh performances, is inspired by the eternal spirit of the chrysanthemum when it bursts into full bloom. In fact, during the Heian era, ladies from the nobility would wipe their faces and bodies with chrysanthemum dew in the hopes of staying young. For the peasants, it was a day to enjoy the chestnut. We now know the chestnut as being a health food rich in vitamin C, and well-balanced in terms of protein and fat. People in the past knew this from experience and eating this in the hopes of longevity on day of the Choyo is a festival tradition that cannot be missed.


Other Articles

HOT ENTRIES

Un repas, c’est tout un voyage !
Dans le splendide Fukuoka, terroir des vrais ramen à la palette ! L’un des mets les plus célèbre...
Know Your Kimono: 9 Different types of Kimono
Kimono literally means "something that is worn" - but there are many types of kimono worn on ...
Picturesque Japan: Unkai Terrace
Heaven in Hokkaido Tokyo's towering skyscrapers - not to forget about the Tokyo Skytree - migh...

CATEGORY RANKING

Know Your Kimono: 9 Different types of Kimono
Kimono literally means "something that is worn" - but there are many types of kimono worn on ...
Know Your Kimono (2): The Obi
Last time we talked about the different types of kimonos. Now we will look at how you tie them. ...
Opinion: Kendo and the 2020 Tokyo Olympics
So, even though the Olympics is to be held in Tokyo in 2020, the most representative of its marti...