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Shibuya is a well-known bustling entertainment district in Tokyo. For first time visitors, the seemingly chaotic pedestrian scramble in front of the station can be quite daunting. But for locals who are used to the traffic conditions, Shibuya is a rare gem that incorporates elements from both east and west. It never fails to enthrall and amazing discoveries are everywhere. The deeper you venture into the streets and alleys, the more fascinating the history and culture. Read on to discover a Shibuya you never known before!

KUNOICHI NINJA CAFÉ 忍者茶房
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Just as the name Kunoichi (the Japanese term for female ninjas) suggests, this, is a place where visitors can learn about the history of ninja arts from the viewpoint of a female practitioner and experience wielding a katana sword or throwing shuriken. At the café, you can enjoy delicious Japanese cuisine and desserts.
*Services are subject to change in May

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Konnoh-Hachimangu-Shrine

Konnoh Hachimangu Shrine 金王八幡宮
The shrine has been in Shibuya for a long time and its history can be traced back thousands of years. Both the Shaden and the Shinmon were built in 1612 and are well preserved. The main deity worshiped here is Emperor Ojin (from around the second century) and it is said that prayers about work are often answered. If you are tired of the Shibuya crowds, this is a great getaway to relax the mind and immerse yourself in history.

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Hen na Cafe 変なカフェ
Newly opened in February, this is the Japan’s first coffee shop where you can enjoy coffee freshly brewed and served by a robot barista. It became a global sensation overnight after debut its. For Japan, a robot-loving society, more and more shops run by robots are expected in the near future. Get your cup of filter drip coffee, Americano, chocolate or matcha flavored latte served by a single-arm robot here!
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amarillo-line-leftToguri Museum of Art 戸栗美術館

One of the few porcelain museums in Japan is actually right here in Shibuya and definitely worth a visit. The museum stands on the land formerly owned by the Nabeshima clan and houses a collection of 7,000 works from China and Korea as well as Imari and Nabeshima, made in Saga Prefecture. As the northwest part of Kyushu was known as Hizen Province in the past, the porcelain made in the area is also referred to as Hizen porcelain.

rightNabeshima Shoto Park 鍋島松濤公園
Nabeshima-Shoto-Park The park was once a villa and Japanese tea garden owned by the Nabeshima family in today’s Saga Prefecture. Originally called “Shotoen,” the park was opened to the public in 1924. The extensive park is a delight to the eyes, with thickly planted cherry blossom trees, maple trees and a nostalgic water wheel next to the pond. The picturesque view almost makes you forget that you’re still in the heart of Tokyo.
amarillo-line-leftGallery TOM ギャラリーTOM
Gallery-Tom Located in a quiet and not-so-busy area of Shibuya, Gallery TOM is a private art museum founded in 1984 to help visually impaired people experience art through their sense of touch. The gallery is a manifestation of Japanese thoughtfulness and attention to details. Stop by for a whole new experience in art!
right HMV Record Shop Shibuya HMV レコードショップ渋谷
Udagawacho is home to the world’s leading record street. If you are a fan of vinyl records, this is where you have to be! HMV Record Shop and many other record specialty shops are just behind Shibuya’s Tokyu Hands Store. Who knows, you might even bump into famous DJs on a treasure hunt to find rare records.

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Shibuya Niku Yokocho 渋谷肉横丁
Known as Japan’s largest meat-themed park, Shibuya Niku Yokocho has gathered 26 restaurants specializing in all kinds of meat cuisine, ranging from chicken, deep fried meat tempura, sushi made with fresh beef, and even horse meat. Eager carnivores, get ready to go restaurant hopping and eat plenty of meat!

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